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20121123
20121123
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at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern, part of a book tv's holiday >> actor and former california governor arnold schwarzenegger joins a group of executives for a discussion on hollywood impact on culture. this marked the launch of the university of southern california's new schwarzenegger institute. the discussion was moderated by ben smith. from los angeles, this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for turning up for this. it is an honor to be here. anyone who has been uncovering policy in new york kind of feels entertainment industry has this enormous power in politics and public policy, and also as a dark matter out there. we do not fully understand how it is affecting and changing what happens on the east coast. we have a remarkable panel of longtime leaders in that industry to help explain that to me and to you. one regret -- he apologizes for not being able to be here with us. he is working on the next "avatar" script. i will bring out the panel. the first person is arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] he is our host today. he is somebody who uniquely came from the
know how to teach real- estate. we will have a job for you. he said -- we are moving to california. i cannot wait to start. he has been very successful. what he said to me after that almost brought me to tears. he said -- this is probably the worst thing that has ever happened to me but it may be the best thing that has ever happened to me. that spirit and willingness to look ahead. this is the situation i am in. i will not let it get me down. give me my pathetic limbs. turn me loose. i will show you what i can do. these kids not only have technical skills, they have been trying to say yes sir. they show up on time. they are disciplined. they have been strange to get the job done. -- trained to get the job done. it stars in the beginning. we teach them right face and left face. you learn the importance of teamwork. [laughter] it is also an efficient way to move a group of human beings around by marching them. they are introduced to a drill sergeant. the drill sergeant is the worst thing they could have ever imagined. he would send -- i am now your mother and your daddy. forget all of
and gentleman, the senator from the state of california, the honorable dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, leader pelosi, mrs. bush, leader reed, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government, this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years, i have followed the tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988, she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying has been -- husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2003, following an assassina
, that it is a government service in essence. host: fairfield, california. republican callers. you are on the air. caller: my only comment is that i think that the post office is just an archaic institution during i don't think -- institution. i don't think one dime of taxpayer money should be spent on it. host: let's clarify that point. guest: taxpayers pay about -- i think about $100 million. it sounds like a lot. but i believe it goes to pay for things like free delivery of freeballots -- free delivery of overseas ballots, services to the blind. those are the things provided. not a routine services. those services are basically funded out of the operating funds, the revenues, the sales revenues, so to speak, of the social-service. and so, i would not say it has been a burden so much on the taxpayers. the burden and the concern is it would be a burden in the future if it is not able to be a viable business and it leaves behind a lot of light of these like benefits owed, health care benefits. host: sorry to interrupt. i wanted him to clarify that point before you go on. caller: i use e-mail, i use ups,
. he adores this little boy who is growing up with multiple people who love him. california is about to pass a law making it legal for somebody to have three parents with all the different arrangements. if you have a step father who wants to adopt you had a biological father and mother, annie permutation of that, why can we not think about that? hillary clinton said it takes a village, and traditionally you have lots of family members. if you have more people in a child's live to love them, that is a good thing. >> thank you for that. now, let's get to the questions. please identify yourself if you would when you ask your question. i think we have somebody right here. >> i am the chief of staff to a member of congress. i have three children. i was a single parent for 16 years until two years ago when i got married. that was one thing i did not notice come up in the conversation. talk about marriage and families. i do agree there are lots of similarities in terms of the desire both men and women to parent and be there. i think one of the elements of our society is taking care of singl
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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